Isaiah the Solitary: “I entreat you not to leave your heart unguarded”

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Isaiah the Solitary.jpg“I entreat you not to leave your heart unguarded, so long as you are in the body. Just as a farmer cannot feel confident about the crop growing in his fields, because he does not know what will happen to it before it is stored away in his granary, so a man should not leave his heart unguarded so long as he still has breath in his nostrils.
Up to his last breath he cannot know what passion will attack him; so long as he breathes, therefore, he must not leave his heart unguarded, but should at every moment pray to God for His help and mercy.”
St Isaiah the Solitary, On Guarding the Intellect, in the Philokalia

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Malcolm Muggeridge: “What does the Crucifixion signify in an age like ours?”

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“What does the Crucifixion signify in an age like ours? I see it in the first place as a sublime mockery of all earthly authority and power. The crown of thorns, the purple robe, the ironical title “King of the Jews,” were intended to mock or parody Christ’s pretensions to be the Messiah; in fact, they rather hold up to ridicule and contempt all crowns, all robes, all kings that ever were. It was a sick joke that back-fired. No one it seems to me, who has fully grasped the Crucifixion can ever again take seriously any expression or instrument of worldly power, however venerable, glittering or seemingly formidable.”
Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus Rediscovered

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Peter Kreeft: “Prosperity is boring”

Amen!

Arguably the most important and fitting quote I’ve come across this month.

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“Prosperity is boring. The suicide rate in Sweden is something like a thousand times that of Haiti. And even revolution is boring. No revolution can survive its own success. Every revolution turns into a new tyranny, and Ecclesiastes’ cycles return like the clouds after a rain. The big, blazing, terrible truth about man is that he has a heaven-sized hole in his heart, and nothing else can fill it. We pass our lives trying to fill the Grand Canyon with marbles. As Augustine said: ‘Thou has made us for thyself, and our hearts are restless until they rest in thee.’ That’s the greatest sentence ever written outside Scripture because it tells us the secret of our destiny, our happiness-and our unhappiness.”
Peter Kreeft, Fundamentals of the Faith

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